Glossary

Katabatic wind

From the Greek word katabatikos meaning "going downhill", a katabatic wind is a wind that blows down a topographic incline such as a hill, mountain, or glacier. Such winds, particularly when they occur over a wide area, are sometimes called fall winds. Katabatic winds are mainly found in Antartica. As the Earth is a sphere, on a large scale, the South Pole is on a point higher than the Ross Ice Shelf or other coastal areas. There, the winds reach speeds of up to 200mph speeding down the ice.

Katabatic winds

From the Greek word katabatikos meaning "going downhill", katabatic winds are winds that blow down a topographic incline such as a hill, mountain, or glacier. Such winds, particularly when they occur over a wide area, are sometimes called fall winds. Katabatic winds are mainly found in Antartica. As the Earth is a sphere, on a large scale, the South Pole is on a point higher than the Ross Ice Shelf or other coastal areas. There, the winds reach speeds of up to 200mph speeding down the ice.

Kiloton

The energy of a nuclear explosion that is equivalent to the explosion of 1,000 tons of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. TNT is a chemical compound with the formula CH3C6(NO2)3CH3 best known as a useful explosive material with convenient handling properties. The explosive yield of TNT is considered the standard measure of strength of bombs and other explosives.

Kilotons

The energy of a nuclear explosion that is equivalent to the explosion of 1,000 tons of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. TNT is a chemical compound with the formula CH3C6(NO2)3CH3 best known as a useful explosive material with convenient handling properties. The explosive yield of TNT is considered the standard measure of strength of bombs and other explosives.

Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO)

KEDO was established in early 1995 to implement the 1994 Agreed Framework between the DPRK and the United States. Its primary responsibilities were to finance and supply the agreed to light-water reactor (LWR) project, to provide heavy oil to the DPRK to meet its interim heating and electricity-generation needs, and to provide for the implementation of other measures required under the terms of the Agreed Framework. Thirteen states are members: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, the European Union, Indonesia, Japan, New Zealand, Poland, the Republic of Korea, the United States and Uzbekistan. However, due to DPRK's nuclear weapons development in violation of the 1994 Agreed Framework, the KEDO project has been suspended since November 2003.  Since that time, Framatome ANP/DE&S, as KEDO's Technical Support Consultant, assists KEDO in the management of the LWR project as directed by the Project Operations Division.

Krakatoa eruption

Krakatoa is an Indonesian volcanic island in the Sunda Strait between Java and Sumatra. Throughout recorded history, the volcano itself has erupted repeatedly, with disastrous consequences. The best known eruption was a series of massive explosions on 26-27 August 1883. Among the most violent volcanic events in modern times, it was recorded with a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 6, which is equivalent to 200 megatonnes of TNT or about 13,000 times the yield of the Little Boy bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan in 1945.

Kyoto Protocol

Adopted in December 1997 at the UN Climate Change Convention, the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is an international agreement that sets binding targets for industrialized countries to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These gases are considered partly responsible for global warming. Proposed reductions amount to an average of five per cent against 1990 levels over the period 2008 - 2012. Each country that signed the protocol agreed to its own specific target. As of May 2008, the United States and Kazakhstan were the only signatory nations not to have ratified the Protocol.