1 May 2015

Excerpts of statements referring to the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and/or nuclear testing (Main Committee I):


Group of Non-Aligned States Parties (NAM) –
Reza Najafi (Iran), Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "We stress the significance of achieving the universal adherence to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and realizing its entry into force. While this Treaty is a practical step for systematic and progressive efforts towards nuclear disarmament as well as non-proliferation in all its aspects, it cannot substitute for the objective of complete elimination of nuclear weapons. Pending its entry into force, we strongly call for immediate and unconditional cessation of all nuclear weapon tests and complete prohibition of nuclear weapons research and development, putting an end to conducting nuclear weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions, or nuclear weapon tests in alternative ways, as well as the use of new technologies for upgrading existing nuclear weapon systems.
...
Recommendations of the Group of the Non-Aligned State Parties to the Treaty, inter alia, are as follows:
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On Nuclear Testing:
To strongly support a comprehensive ban on all forms of nuclear-weapon tests without exception, as well as any nuclear explosion, and reaffirm the importance of such ban in the realization of objectives of the Non-Proliferation Treaty.
To support the objectives of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, which is intended to enforce a comprehensive ban on all nuclear test explosions, and to stop the qualitative development of nuclear weapons and to stress that while the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty is a practical step for systematic and progressive efforts towards nuclear disarmament as well as non-proliferation in all its aspects, it cannot substitute the objective of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons.
To call upon the nuclear-weapon States to refrain from conducting nuclear-weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions, or nuclear-weapon tests in alternative ways, as well as the use of technologies for upgrading the existing nuclear weapons system, as they are in contravention of the objectives of the CTBT and would undermine its effectiveness and contradict the commitments undertaken at the NPT Review Conferences by nuclear weapon States."
(full statement)


Mexico – Enrique Roman Morey, Permanent Representative of Peru to the United Nations: "We believe that the best tribute that we can render to the survivors of the attacks of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and to the victims of nuclear tests is to accept without hesitance that nuclear weapons have no place in the construction of a safer and peaceful world and that nuclear weapons need to prohibited and eliminated so they cannot be used again, by any actor and under any circumstances."
(full statement)


Japan - Toshio Sano, Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament: ''The early entry into force of the CTBT is vital. Bearing in mind that the CTBT was opened for signature almost 20 years ago, Japan urges all countries that have not yet signed or ratified the Treaty, especially the eight remaining Annex 2 countries to take concrete actions to sign and ratify without further elay, and without waiting for other countries. The nuclear-weapon States should acknowledge once again that they have a special responsibility for the early entry into force of this Treaty. While the CTBT has not yet come into force, the fact that the nuclear test ban has been adhered to by the international community with very limited deviation is a proof that it has become a de facto international norm. Based on this reality, we strongly appeal to all nuclear-weapon States and other states that hold nuclear weapons to declare or maintain  a  moratorium on nuclear weapon test explosions until  the entry into force of the Treaty, and we strongly urge all countries to refrain from any nuclear test. We believe  that  the  new  working  paper on the CTBT that was recently submitted by Japan together with five other countries, which are active promoters of the CTBT, will contribute to the discussions at this Review Conference. As a country hosting the meeting of the Group of Eminent Persons (GEM) that will be held in Hiroshima in August, and as a co-Chair of the Conference on Facilitating the 9th Entry into Force of the CTBT in September, Japan reaffirms its strong commitment and further support for the CTBT’s early entry into force."
(full statement)


Argentina - n.n.: "Looking at this scenario, the entry into force of the CTBT should not be postponed any further, for which still requires the ratification of key players." [working translation from Spanish]
(full statement)


Australia – John Quinn, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "The building blocks of disarmament, elaborated in our NPDI papers, are well known. They include: …entry into force of the CTBT...
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We renew our call upon all remaining Annex II States to ratify the CTBT without delay so that the treaty can finally enter into force. It is disappointing we still find ourselves some distance from achieving this longstanding priority goal."
(full statement)


Russia – Mikhail Uliyanov, Acting head of the Delegation of the Russian Federation: "The fact that the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has not come into force since its conclusion almost 20 years ago also affects modern international relations. By the way, the Russian Federation ratified this Treaty in 2000."
(full statement)


Germany – Michael Biontino, Permanent Representative of Germany to the Conference on Disarmament: "Some of these obligations require further negotiation and consequently cannot be achieved unilaterally. Others, such as the ratification of the CTBT, can be brought about without the corresponding engagement of other States. It is highly regrettable that the CTBT has not yet entered into force in spite of the overwhelming support for this goal from bother the 2000 and 2010 Review Conferences. The entry into force of the CTBT would be in the security interests of all states. In the 21st century, there is no place for nuclear testing! Germany welcomes the fact that the International Monitoring System has already proven its effectiveness by detecting nuclear tests. States Signatories must increase the political will and provide adequate resources to complete the verification regime. Germany is proud to be the third largest contributor to the important work of the CTBTO."
(full statement)


France – Jean-Hugues Simon-Michel, Permanent Representative of France to the Conference on Disarmament: "The entry into force of the CTBT is our priority and is long overdue. At present, there is no good argument to keep postponing it: the Treaty’s verification regime has proved its worth; waiting for the ratification of others is not a better justification for inaction."
(full statement)


United Kingdom – Guy Pollard, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the Conference on Disarmament: "The UK was among the first States to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. We have maintained a voluntary moratorium on nuclear test explosions since 1991. We now provide extensive technical, financial and expert support to the three pillars of the CTBTO’s verification system. We oppose calls from some states to cut funding to the CTBTO’s technical organs. We have actively engaged in EU and P5 work streams aimed at improving the International Monitoring System and regularly sponsor projects in support of the CTBTO. A recent example is a successful workshop providing training on using new open sources tools and technologies for verification purposes. The UK played an active role in Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE 14) providing a significant amount of equipment and technical expertise to the exercise. We believe that IFE 14 has demonstrated a step change in the CTBTO’s On Site Inspection capability."
(full statement)


United States
– Robert A. Wood, Representative of the United States to the Conference on Disarmament: "Ongoing P5 work on critical Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) inspection techniques will help enhance that Treaty’s verification regime.
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In the multilateral domain, the United States has observed a moratorium on nuclear explosive testing since 1992, and we will continue to pursue ratification of the CTBT. We further call on all states to refrain from nuclear explosive testing and to sign and ratify the Treaty if they have not yet done so."
(full statement)

 

next: 4 May 2015