28 April 2015

Excerpts of statements referring to the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and/or nuclear testing:


Kyrgyzstan
- Askar Beshimov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs: "My delegation also shares the views of those States Parties, who attach particular importance to the expeditious ratification and entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. My country ratified it in 2003."
(full statement)


Romania
- State Secretary Daniel Ionita: "We also want to voice our support for the further strengthening of the non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament regime through the early entry into force of the CTBT."
(full statement)

 
Joint Statement on the Humanitarian Consequences of Nuclear Weapons
- delivered by Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz: "Past experience from the use and testing of nuclear weapons has amply demonstrated the unacceptable humanitarian consequences caused by the immense, uncontrollable destructive capability and indiscriminate nature of these weapons....A key message from experts and international organisations was that no State or international body could address the immediate humanitarian emergency caused by a nuclear weapon detonation or provide adequate assistance to victims.”...The catastrophic effects of a nuclear weapon detonation, whether by accident, miscalculation or design, cannot be adequately addressed."
(full statement)

Canada - Lynne Yelich, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs: "North Korea’s nuclear tests, uranium enrichment and ballistic missile activities are at the height of arrogant and cynical behaviour."
(full statement)

Serbia - Roksanda Nincic, State Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs: "Serbia shares the view that the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) can serve as a key complementary document to the NPT and we continue to support efforts for its entry into force."
(full statement)

Czech Republic - Jakub Kulhánek, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs: "“The Czech Republic, as the first European country to have ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, would like to reaffirm its support to the process leading to the entry into force of the CTBT, which will significantly strengthen the international security architecture based on the NPT. We fully support the efforts of the Provisional Technical Secretariat to further develop the CTBT verification regime as a strong non-proliferation and confidence-building instrument."
(full statement)

Germany - Michael Roth, Minister of State for Europe at the Federal Foreign Office: "Germany shares the concern of those who want to see the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty enter into force sooner rather than later. In the 21st century, there is neither the space nor any reason for nuclear tests. The existing moratoria on testing are welcome, but a legally binding treaty is urgently needed."
(full statement)

Namibia - Maureen Magreth Hinda, Deputy Minister of International Relations and Cooperation: "It is in the same vein that we have ratified the CTBT which is an integral part of the disarmament architecture. We call for the earliest entry into force of the CTBT."
(full statement)

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) - Kyaw Tin, Permanent Representative of Myanmar to the United Nations: "At the same time, we must put an end to the continued qualitative improvement of technologies to the existing nuclear weapons systems, and close all nuclear weapons test sites. In this context, ASEAN Member States believe that the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) require universal adherence. We also call on the remaining Annex 2 States, whose signature and ratification are crucial for the CTBT to enter into force, to materialize their commitment. In this context, we welcome the progress made towards universalization of the Treaty, and the recent ratifications by Brunei Darussalam, Chad, Congo, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq and Niue."
(full statement)

Caribbean Community (CARICOM) - delivered by Courtenay Rattray, Permanent Representative to the United Nations of Jamaica): "As small island developing States, CARICOM States view the prospects of a nuclear detonation, whether by design or accident, as an existential horror that would decimate the entire region.

Mr President, the elimination of the testing of nuclear weapons remains a critical element in the overall process of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. To this end, we urge the 8 remaining Annex 2 States to sign and/or ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty immediately and unconditionally, in order to enable its entry into force. We applaud the work of the Provisional Secretariat of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization in promoting the entry into force of the Treaty. Pending the entry into force of the CTBT, all States should continue to abide by the moratorium on testing."
(full statement)

Mongolia - Och Od, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "The Comprehensive Test Ban treaty (CTBT) is catalyst for nuclear disarmament. It is a strong instrument for non-proliferation. Progress on the CTBT is the one multilateral non-proliferation and disarmament measures that is most urgently awaited by the international community. It is also one measure where progress can be achieved in a relatively short time. Thus, the CTBT should be brought into force at an early date and I call upon those States that have not ratified it, in particular the remaining Annex II States to do so urgently."
(full statement)


European Union
– delivered by Federica Mogherini, High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission: "The entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty remains a top priority for the EU and we confirm our full support to the excellent work of the CTBTO.
...
The EU condemned the nuclear tests conducted by North Korea, as well as the DPRK's threat of another nuclear test in outright violation of its international obligations, in particular under relevant UN Security Council Resolutions that urge the DPRK to abandon its nuclear weapons programme and return to the NPT and IAEA Safeguards at an early date."
(full statement)


Cyprus – Andreas Mavroyiannis, Ambassador, Special Envoy of the Minister of Foreign Affairs: "Turning to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, Cyprus considers its entry into force to be a top priority."
(full statement)


Argentina – María Cristina Perceval, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "In the same sense, we cannot put off anymore the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, for what it is still required the ratification of essential actors."
(full statement)


Belgium – Bénédicte Frankinet, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "We remain concerned about the lack of progress on key building blocks, such as the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the commencement of substantive work by the Conference on Disarmament, or the negotiation of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. However, this should not stop us from strengthening the already existing instruments.
...
Belgium for its part actively contributes to the efforts to strengthen the CTBT verification regime. Radio-xenon emissions stemming from medical isotope production sites can interfere with the capacity of the International Monitoring System to detect nuclear explosions. Therefore, relevant Belgian institutions are studying options to mitigate those radio-xenon emissions, which would increase the reliability of the International Monitoring System and thus reinforce the credibility of the CTBT."
(full statement)


Brazil – Antonio de Aguiar Patriota, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "It is clear that the so-called "step-by-step" approach advocated by nuclear weapons States has failed to deliver on initial expectations. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty was finalized almost twenty years ago and is not yet in force.
...
Of these measures, perhaps the most urgent is the entry into force of the CTBT. It is inconceivable that, 19 years after the end of negotiations, there is still no prospect for its entry into force. Brazil would like to urge once again all countries that have not acceded to the CTBT, in particular Annex II countries, to do so as a matter of urgency and refrain from any action that would undermine the Treaty's objectives, in particular those related to the modernization of nuclear arsenals, including subcritical or non-explosive tests. In our view, such activities run counter to the object and purpose of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), its spirit, if not the letter."
...
Brazil strongly condemned the nuclear tests carried out by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) in violation of its obligations under the relevant UN Security Council resolutions.”
(full statement)


Turkey - Halit Çevik, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "The secession of all nuclear weapon tests constitutes an important building bloc toward both nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. In this regard, I would like to stress the centrality of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The international community has spent enough time waiting for the CTBT to enter into force. We, once again, encourage all remaining States to ratify the Treaty as soon as possible."
(Transcribed from webcast)

Philippines – Lourdes O. Yparraguirre, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "On the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Philippines has repeatedly called for the prompt entry into force of the Treaty and has promoted its universalization at the bilateral, regional and international fora."
(full statement)


Australia – Gillian Bird, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "It will be important that this Review Conference looks forward at practical ways to implement our commitments under the Treaty and the 2010 Action Plan. We must focus on concrete steps such as the entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; commencing negotiations for a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty; and developing robust techniques for verifying disarmament and the dismantlement of nuclear weapons."
(full statement)


France – Jean-Hugues Simon-Michel, Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament, Geneva: "I believe that it is important to welcome here the successful discussions of the Group of Governmental Experts on an FMCT, which report was adopted by consensus at the beginning of this month. This issue is one of the priorities of my country, as well as the entry into force of the CTBT as soon as possible."
(full statement)


Denmark – Susanne Rumohr Haekkerup, Ambassador for Disarmament, Non-proliferation, and Arms Control: "The recommendations of the Vienna Group of Ten cover a broad spectrum of issues: underlining the utmost urgency of the entering into force of the CTBT, calling for the universal application of current-standard IAEA safeguards, stressing the need for effective export controls, and underlining the central role of nuclear safety and security."
(full statement)


Nigeria – Uche Joy Ogwu, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "As a member of the de-alerting and the Non-proliferation and Disarmament Initiative Groups, my delegation supports the measures put forward towards ensuring nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, including increased transparency in nuclear disarmament, the de-alerting of operational readiness of nuclear weapons, continued efforts to facilitate the entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and attempts to commence negotiations of a ban in production and stockpiling of Fissile Material for nuclear weapons as a treaty."
(full statement)


U.S-Japan Joint Statement on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT): "We recognize that further progress is needed. Immediate next steps should include further negotiated nuclear reductions between the United States and Russia, the immediate start of multilateral negotiations of a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty, entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and the protocols to the existing nuclear weapon free zone treaties, and the continued reduction of all types of nuclear weapons, deployed and non-deployed, including through unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral measures.  We further emphasize the importance of applying the principles of irreversibility, verifiability and transparency in the process of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. In this regard, the United States welcomes Japan’s leadership in the Non-proliferation and Disarmament Initiative and Japan’s role as the Co-Chair Country for the Conference on Facilitating the Entry into Force of the CTBT, and Japan welcomes the U.S. initiative to launch the International Partnership on Nuclear Disarmament Verification.
...
We further note the positive role played by civil society, and hope that activities such as the UN Conference on Disarmament Issues and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty’s Group of Eminent Persons Meeting, both to be held in Hiroshima in August, and the Pugwash Conference to be held in Nagasaki in November, will strengthen momentum toward disarmament and non-proliferation.”
(full statement)

 

next: 29 April 2015