29 April 2015

Excerpts of statements referring to the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and/or nuclear testing:


Ukraine -Pavlo Klimkin, Minister of Foreign Affairs:"In this context we also encourage the universalization of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty’s (CTBT) with a view that its entry into force will constitute a tangible stride in attaining the noble objective of a safe and peaceful world free of nuclear weapons."
(full statement)

Norway - Bård Glad Pedersen, State Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs: "We must make real progress towards entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)."
(full statement)


Austria - Alexander Kmentt, Director for Disarmament, Arms Control and Non-proliferation, Federal Ministry for Europe, Integration and Foreign Affairs: "
The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty should be by now the most unequivocal success of multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation efforts. The verification regime of the CTBT has been impressively validated in the past years, most recently through the on-site inspection exercise in Jordan. However, the fact that the CTBT has not yet been brought into legal effect is disappointing and damaging to global disarmament and nonproliferation efforts. We call on Annex II States to take the neccessary steps as soon as possible. In particular, we reject the notion that any one State should wait for another to ratify. The CTBT enters into force only when all Annes II States have done so. Consequently, all Annes II States can and should show leadership on this important Treaty."
(full statement)


Estonia - Margus Kolga, Permanent Representative, New York: "We acknowledge the efforts of the countries seeking early ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and consider its universalization and entry into force to be a top priority. We urge the States, particularly those whose adherence is required for the CTBT to enter into force, to sign and ratify the treaty  without further delay."
(full statement)


Vietnam - Nguyen Phuong Nga, Permanent Representative, New York: "Pending a comprehensive outcome, the entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty should be a priority. We call on states whose ratifications are critical for its entry into force to do so as soon as possible."
(full statement)


Belarus - Andrei Dapkiunas, Permanent Representative, New York: "This explains why for Belarus the NPT is the basis for an all-inclusive and unequivocal “zero” when it comes to nuclear weapons:
-    No to nuclear research to modernize nuclear weapons
-    No to a nuclear arms race
-    No to nuclear testing
-    No to nuclear weapons in our joint home."
(working translation from Russian)
(full statement)


Malta – Christopher Grima, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "Malta also reiterates its call to States not yet Parties of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty to sign and ratify as soon as possible. The entry into force of the CTBT, which should finally ensure that nuclear tests will be permanently and universally abolished, remains a priority for my Government.
...
We condemn the nuclear tests carried out by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in February 2013 and the threat of further nuclear testing."
(full statement)


South Africa – Nozipho Mxakato-Diseko, Deputy Director-General, Multilateral Branch, Department of International Relations and Cooperation: "In this regard, it is important to note that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and the future Fissile Material Treaty both have their roots in the NPT review process."
(full statement)


Bangladesh – Shameem Ahsan, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "Bangladesh believes that entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty that Bangladesh signed in 1996 and ratified in 2000 as the first country from South Asia, is an essential step to achieving a world without nuclear weapons. We, therefore, call for its signature and ratification by all States which are yet to do it."
(full statement)


Singapore – Karen Tan, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "On nuclear disarmament, the NWS have engaged NNWS on issues including the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the voluntary moratorium on conducting any nuclear explosion, and the updates on the New START.
...
Second, all NWS should also refrain from making qualitative improvements to their nuclear weapons and testing them. To this end, the CTBT remains a key tool to advance disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation and to build mutual trust and confidence. We strongly urge all countries, in particular the Annex 2 countries that have yet to sign and ratify the CTBT, to do so."
(full statement)


Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) – Xavier Lasso Mendoza, Permanent Representative to the United Nations (Ecuador): "This approach has not yet achieved the entry into force of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) or the initiation of negotiations for a fissile material treaty, let alone the requirement of elminiating nuclear weapons.
...
In this regard, CELAC reiterates the importance of the early entry into force of the CTBT and urges those States in Annex II of the Treaty whose ratification is essential for its entry into force to accelerate the signature and/or ratification process of this instrument. All States must refrain from nuclear weapon test explosions, other nuclear explosions, or any other relevant non-explosive experiments, including subcritical tests. Such actions are contrary to the objectives and purpose of the CTBT and of the NPT."
(full statement)


Bulgaria – Rayko Raytchev, Director-General for Global Affairs and Minister of Foreign Affairs: "Such practical steps could be: overcoming the impasse in the Conference on Disarmament, including through its enlargement; starting negotiations on a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty, bringing into force the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. We remain convinced that the earliest possible entry into force of the CTBT is a crucial step for furthering the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime."
(full statement)


Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) – Lassina Zerbo, Executive Secretary: "The CTBT is a “stepping stone” for strengthening the NPT and for reinforcing the non-proliferation and disarmament regime. A legally binding test ban represents one key area where all NPT States Parties are already in agreement. We must ask ourselves, why is it that we have failed to bring the CTBT into full legal standing?  It has been nearly twenty years since the opening for signature, and yet the Treaty is still not in force."
(more on the CTBT - see full statement)

Uruguay – Gustavo Álvarez, Director of Multilateral Affairs and Minister of Foreign Affairs: "Uruguay was one of the countries that actively participated in the creation of the CTBT, and therefore  gives full support to the Provisional Secretariat in the implementation and consolidation of the planned system, particularly the International Monitoring System....Here again, it urges states to ratify the Treaty, with the particular focus on those States in Annex 2 to proceed with the relevant ratifications as soon as possible." [working translation from Spanish](full statement)


Latvia – Jānis Mažeiks, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "In this regard, Latvia places particular importance on the prompt entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). We believe that no linkages should be made between ratifications of the remaining Annex 2 countries. This Treaty is of great added value to global nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. It is the individual responsibility of each state to contribute in this respect. We appreciate the great effort by a number of actors, including the EU, in promoting the ratifications of the Treaty."(full statement)

Samoa – Ali’ioaiga Feturi Elisaia, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "We are a Party of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty and have concluded a safeguard agreement with the IAEA given its critical role in facilitating peaceful uses of nuclear energy with verification being at the core.”...“Some Pacific island countries were sites for nuclear testing. The scars of fear and mistrust as a consequence of this experience has given our region a shared point-of reference that has shaped our perspective on nuclear disarmament....The physical and emotional scars on the people affected by the nuclear tests carried out in the Pacific last century will not cease or go-away with time. It is etched in people's memories and will live on forever....Let me conclude by adding Samoa’s voice to the near-unanimous call made by previous speakers on the need for a comprehensive treaty on the abolition of nuclear tests to rid the world of the scourge of these weapons of mass destruction. We further call on States who have not yet done so ratify the CTBT, particularly those States whose ratification is need for the treaty’s entry into force."(full statement)

Tanzania – Ramadhan Mwinyi, Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "Among the challenges hindering the move towards complete disarmament and Non-Proliferation regime is the delay of the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Tanzania ratified the CTBT in 2004 and in this regard we call for the urgent entry into force of the Treaty, as such would contribute to the achievement of a nuclear free world."
(full statement)


Indonesia – Desra Percaya, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "At the 2010 NPT Review Conference, Indonesia announced the initiation of the process of ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which was completed in 2012. The ratification reflects our commitment and fulfilment of our obligation toward ourselves and the international community on securing peace. In the past two years, together with Hungary, as Co-Presidents of the Article XIV Conference on CTBT, Indonesia has played its role as part of our joint effort to achieve universalization and the entry into force of the CTBT. In that period, five states (Iraq, Guinea-Bissau, Republic of Congo, Niue and Angola) have ratified the Treaty. Indonesia calls on all States that have not signed or ratified the Treaty, particularly those in the Annex 2, to do so without delay. As long as the CTBT and its monitoring system are not legally in operation, threats to international peace and security caused by the tests of nuclear weapons will exist."
(full statement)


Cambodia – Ry Tuy, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "While we are reviewing the NPT, the Convention on the Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) serves as one of the important legal instrument to contain States’ attempt to make any test of nuclear weapons, pending the closure of all test sites. For its part, Cambodia signed and ratified in the year 2000 for the CTBT. While looking forward to its entry into force, we must double our efforts to ensure its universality for the effective implementation of the ban of nuclear weapons test."
(full statement)


Greece – Catherine Boura, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "Additional disarmament steps important for Greece include: (a) the ratification of the CTBT for the comprehensive ban of nuclear tests, a necessary step forward replacing today’s voluntaring test banning among the nuclear powers, […]."
(full statement)


Lao People’s Democratic Republic – Khiane Phanhsourivong, Permanent Representative to the United Nations: "Universal adherence to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) would certainly contribute to the promotion of Nuclear Disarmament and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Therefore, we welcome the recent ratification of the Treaty by Brunei Darussalam, Chad, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Indonesia and Niue which is an important step towards the universalization of the Treaty and hope that those that have not done so would sign and ratify the said Treaty."
(full statement)

 

next: 30 April 2015