Radionuclide monitoring

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Data sent by the radionuclide stations to the IDC do not only include gamma radiation spectra, but also meteorological and state-of-health information. State-of-health data provide information on the station’s operational status and the quality of the raw monitoring data it transmits.

Support is provided by 16 radionuclide laboratories, which conduct sample analyses if and when necessary. The laboratories analyse samples suspected of containing radionuclide materials that may have been produced by a nuclear explosion. They also conduct routine analyses of regular samples to provide quality control of a station’s air sample measurements.

Radionuclide stations send monitoring data to the IDC,
but also information on the station’s operational status
and the quality of the transmitted monitoring data.

INGE (International Noble Gas Experiment)

On an experimental basis, half of all radionuclide stations (i.e. 40) are equipped with the noble gas monitoring technology. Complementary to radionuclide particulate monitoring, the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) was established in 1999 to test the measuring of radionuclide noble gases released by nuclear explosions.

The International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) was
established in 1999 to test the measuring of radionuclide
noble gases released by nuclear explosions.

Four measurement systems were included in the experiment: Russia’s ARIX (Analyzer of Xenon Radioisotopes); the United States’ ARSA (Automated Radioxenon Sampler-Analyzer); Sweden’s SAUNA (Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer); and France’s SPALAX (Systéme de Prélèvements et d’Analyse en Ligne. d’Air pour quantifier le Xénon), of which three are currently in use.

As a result of the experiment, the first radionuclide station with noble gas detection capabilities was formally integrated into the global verification regime on 19 August 2010. The noble gas measurement set-up is co-located with radionuclide station RN75 in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States.